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Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Increased Federal Cost Share for Hurricane Michael Recovery

Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Incr…

Following Hurricane Micha...

Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Increased Federal Cost Share for Hurricane Michael Recovery

Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Incr…

Following Hurricane Micha...

Edd Sorenson comes through with successful rescue

Edd Sorenson comes through with suc…

Middle of the night phone...

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Shelia Mader

Shelia Mader

Sports Editor

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Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Increased Federal Cost Share for Hurricane Michael Recovery

Following Hurricane Michael Upgrade to a Category 5 Storm 

On Friday, April 19th, Governor Ron DeSantis sent a letter to President Donald Trump requesting an increase in the federal cost share from 75 percent to 90 percent for the remainder of Hurricane Michael recovery. This request follows the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s announcement that Hurricane Michael has been upgraded to a Category 5 hurricane – only the fourth Category 5 storm to ever impact the United States and the first to impact Florida as a Category 5 since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

“I am officially requesting an increase in federal funding for Hurricane Michael recovery from 75 to 90 percent,” said Governor DeSantis. “Since my first full day in office when I visited Northwest Florida, it was clear that the efforts to rebuild and recover were far from over. An increase in the federal share will help Northwest Florida tremendously and I thank President Trump for his previous commitment to fully fund the first 45 days of recovery from this storm. I look forward to continuing to work with the President to ensure Northwest Florida completely recovers.”

“At the Division of Emergency Management, we recognized the devastation this storm caused and took action in January by putting in place new processes and procedures to get funding out as quickly as possible,” said FDEM Director Jared Moskowitz. “I applaud Governor DeSantis for providing leadership and requesting 90 percent federal funding on the same day that Hurricane Michael was upgraded to a Category 5. This increase in federal funding will provide critical savings to Panhandle communities during their recovery.”

The President has the authority to issue a waiver and increase the federal cost share for hurricane recovery from the standard 75 percent to 90 percent prior to costs reaching the 90 percent threshold. With the recent upgrade of Hurricane Michael to a Category 5, as well as the tremendous amount of debris removal performed since the storm’s impact, the state estimates that this threshold will be met in the future. This change in the federal cost share would save the state and Northwest Florida communities hundreds of millions of dollars.

In January, Governor DeSantis announced that President Donald Trump granted his request for 45 days of 100% federal cost share for Hurricane Michael debris removal and emergency protective measures. Prior to Governor DeSantis securing this commitment, the federal government had only granted five days of 100% cost share. These additional 40 days saved the state and Northwest Florida almost half a billion dollars.

Governor Ron DeSantis Requests Increased Federal Cost Share for Hurricane Michael Recovery

Following Hurricane Michael Upgrade to a Category 5 Storm 

On Friday, April 19th, Governor Ron DeSantis sent a letter to President Donald Trump requesting an increase in the federal cost share from 75 percent to 90 percent for the remainder of Hurricane Michael recovery. This request follows the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s announcement that Hurricane Michael has been upgraded to a Category 5 hurricane – only the fourth Category 5 storm to ever impact the United States and the first to impact Florida as a Category 5 since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

“I am officially requesting an increase in federal funding for Hurricane Michael recovery from 75 to 90 percent,” said Governor DeSantis. “Since my first full day in office when I visited Northwest Florida, it was clear that the efforts to rebuild and recover were far from over. An increase in the federal share will help Northwest Florida tremendously and I thank President Trump for his previous commitment to fully fund the first 45 days of recovery from this storm. I look forward to continuing to work with the President to ensure Northwest Florida completely recovers.”

“At the Division of Emergency Management, we recognized the devastation this storm caused and took action in January by putting in place new processes and procedures to get funding out as quickly as possible,” said FDEM Director Jared Moskowitz. “I applaud Governor DeSantis for providing leadership and requesting 90 percent federal funding on the same day that Hurricane Michael was upgraded to a Category 5. This increase in federal funding will provide critical savings to Panhandle communities during their recovery.”

The President has the authority to issue a waiver and increase the federal cost share for hurricane recovery from the standard 75 percent to 90 percent prior to costs reaching the 90 percent threshold. With the recent upgrade of Hurricane Michael to a Category 5, as well as the tremendous amount of debris removal performed since the storm’s impact, the state estimates that this threshold will be met in the future. This change in the federal cost share would save the state and Northwest Florida communities hundreds of millions of dollars.

In January, Governor DeSantis announced that President Donald Trump granted his request for 45 days of 100% federal cost share for Hurricane Michael debris removal and emergency protective measures. Prior to Governor DeSantis securing this commitment, the federal government had only granted five days of 100% cost share. These additional 40 days saved the state and Northwest Florida almost half a billion dollars.

Edd Sorenson comes through with successful rescue

Middle of the night phone calls are not an everyday occurrence for Marianna’s Edd Sorenson but they are not uncommon. When he was called Wednesday morning (4/17/19) at 2:00 a.m., he pretty much knew he would be in route to another rescue before daylight. His expertise in diving was needed in Tennessee where Josh Bratchley was trapped in a full water-filled cave. 

Bratchley had failed to exit the cave he and four others were exploring, according to the Jackson County (Tennessee) Emergency Management Agency.  The divers dove into the cave in Gainesboro, just north of Cookeville but noticed upon exiting that Bratchley was missing. Bratchley was a very experienced diver, having been a part of the rescue team involved in saving the Thai soccer team last year. This time it was Bratchley who needed to be rescued.  

That’s when the call came for Sorenson. In an interview with Sorenson Friday morning, he said, “Their experts did seven or eight dives looking for him over the course of seven to 10 hours, something like that. Finally, they called 911 and when 911 got all of the information, they said, ‘We need to call Edd’. I was called about two in the morning.” 

Sorenson drove to Tallahassee to take a flight that connected to a flight in Atlanta, leaving his home within an hour of receiving the call.  From Atlanta, he flew to Nashville where he had arranged for a fellow cave diver to meet him at the airport in Nashville to drive him to the cave sight and do surface support for him. Upon arriving at the airport, Sorensen said, “When I was waiting for my connecting in Atlanta, Bryan from the Hamilton County Rescue called me and said that time was of the essence and they were going to have THP fly me over in a helicopter standing by. We got all my gear out of baggage claim. They drove me two blocks to the THP hanger where the helicopter was waiting. They flew me right to the sight, landed in a little field right next to the cave.”

About the chain of events once Sorenson arrived at the sight, he said, “There was first a pre-dive briefing in the mobile command center they had set up where I looked at the map, talked to the rescue divers who were on scene who were his dive partners, what they had done, what they encountered, what I would possibly encounter. Then I had to put my rebreather together, gear up all my tanks and set up everything which took a little less than an hour. Then they asked since my partner was coming in from Arkansas and was about an hour behind, would you mind going in by yourself. I told them no and that’s when I went in and I think my total dive time was just under 50 minutes.”

When asked about his total number of rescues, Sorenson said, “Rescues in completely water-filled caves are very rare. I think there are only 10 rescues in completely water-filled caves like the Thai rescue was a dry cave that had water in it from a flood. But in completely water-filled caves, I think there’s only been 10 rescues ever and I’ve had six of them. And I think there’s only three other people on the planet that have one.” 

We asked Sorenson if there had ever been a time that he had any fear of not coming out of cave rescue alive. Sorensen said, “I don’t really know how to answer that. When you’re going into a situation like this, there’s always the fear of if he is panic stricken, a panic diver can kill me too. If he’s okay when we go in the water and then panics, because usually when you take a diver out of an extremely stressful situation and he gets to a safe spot like Josh did and you take him back into that horrible situation, they can snap in a blink of an eye and kill you. So that thought crosses my mind. I’ve been doing this for 22 years so I’m pretty experienced in what can go wrong and so it’s there in the back of my mind, whatever it takes to make this not happen.  My grandpa had a thing, what’s the best way to deal with a problem – don’t have it. So, that’s the way I was brought up from an early age. My dad always told me from an early age that you are always to help your fellow man if at all possible. So, all I can do is think about what can possibly go wrong and how do we prevent that from happening. That’s why when I was getting him out, I gave him a play by play of what we were going to encounter. And normally, every time it wraps around a rock to change direction, a cave diver would feel around that rock to find where the line comes out on the other side. I wanted to take all the thinking out of it. So, I told him, each time we get to a tie off, I’m going to physically take your hand and put it on the line that I want you to go on. I took all the thinking, all the stress precursors out of it so that he just had a nice smooth ride out and it went quite well.”  

After spending the night, Sorenson was back in Jackson County, Florida Friday with business as usual. 

Abby Perkins moving up from Pirate to Governor

  • Published in Sports

Abby Perkins sat at a table in Sneads Auditorium last Friday afternoon with family, friends, coaches, teammates and classmates gathered around her to witness her signing her way to continue her softball playing days. Wallace Community College saw Perkins play and liked what they saw.

Other colleges of interest were Gulf Coast Community College, Andrews, Enterprise and Daytona State but Perkins said Wallace was where she was happiest, “The first time I went there to work out, I just felt at home when I got there.  I felt really good about it.” 

Perkins played middle school at Grand Ridge Middle School before moving to Sneads High School. She has played under coach Shawn Graham for the last three years and played under veteran and now retired from softball coach Kelvin Johnson her freshman year. 

Perkins home spot on the field is shortstop but has played a little second base also.  In 19 games this year, Perkins has a .795 fielding percentage. At the plate, she’s been nothing short of outstanding. She has a .407 batting average in 59 at bats.  She has a .514 on base percentage with a .677 slugging percentage. She has scored 27 runs, had 24 hits, including two doubles and 12 RBIs. She has been issued 13 free passes by way of walks and has taken one for the team five times. 

Coach Shawn Graham couldn’t be happier for his player, “Abby is a spectacular kid, I can’t think of a better person. She plays the game like you’re supposed to. She plays it with a lot of heart and she’s her own worst critic at times. She is a great athlete. We are blessed to have her and we are sure going to miss her but are definitely glad she’s getting to achieve her dream of playing college softball.” 

Perkins is undecided about what she will major in at college but as honor student at Sneads High, she’s certain to be a success. Perkins is an all-A student and member of the Beta Club.  

Abby is very grateful for where she is today and readily thanks those who have helped her get to where she is, “All my coaches, my mom, my dad, Aurlee (sister) and God.” 

Abby is the daughter of Jeremy and Brandi Perkins.  Besides Aurlee, she an older sister and a younger brother.

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