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How to build a drop-zone bench

  • Written by  By Danny Lipford
How to build a drop-zone bench

A bench that holds baskets underneath for storage makes the perfect drop zone before entering the house. Follow these instructions to build one for your garage or mud room:

The width of your drop-zone bench will depend on the size and number of baskets you plan to store beneath it. Ours is about 48 inches wide and 17 inches high. We’re using 1×12 pine shelving that has already been primed and painted.

Notch the two legs on the backside to accommodate the baseboard and allow the bench to rest against the wall. Trim down the width of the legs by about an inch from their stock width of 11-1/4 inches.

Attach the seat to the legs with finishing nails. Leave a 3/4-inch overhang outside each leg.

Add 2-inch wide braces directly under the seat, between the legs at both the front and back of the bench. Use a countersink bit to drill a pilot hole, and secure this joint with 2-inch screws to give the bench both vertical and lateral strength.

Just above the baseboard notch on the backside of the legs, add a 1×2 brace between the legs with wood screws.

When the bench goes in place against the wall, secure it to the studs through both the upper and lower back braces.

Watch the video (https://www.todayshomeowner.com/video/how-to-build-a-drop-zone-bench/ )for details.

For more information, visit TodaysHomeowner.com.

 

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